Category Archives: C++

Asynchronous Best Practices in C++/CX (Part 2)

This is part two in a series of articles on asynchronous coding in C++/CX. See the introduction here.

  1. Prefer a task chain to nested tasks
  2. Be aware of thread scheduling rules
  3. Be aware of object and parameter lifetimes
  4. Consider the effect of OS suspend/resume
  5. Style: never put a try/catch block around a task chain.
  6. References

2. Be Aware of Thread Scheduling Rules

Asynchronous Best Practices in C++/CX (Part 1)

For me, the steepest learning curves with the Universal Windows Platform (UWP) was the use of asynchronous APIs and the various libraries for dealing with them. Any operation that may take more than 50ms is now asynchronous, and in many cases you can’t even call the synchronous equivalent from Win32 or C. This includes networking operations, file I/O, picker dialogs, hardware device enumeration and more. While these APIs are pretty natural when writing C# code, in C++/CX it tends to be a pretty ugly affair. After two years of use, I now have a few “best practices” to share.
C++/CX offers two different approaches for dealing with asynchronous operations:

  1. task continuations using the Parallel Patterns Library (PPL)
  2. coroutines (as of early 2016)

Personally, I vastly prefer coroutines; having co_await gives C++/CX a distinctly C# flavour, and the entire API starts to feel “natural.” However, at my current job we have not yet standardized on coroutines, and have a mix of both approaches instead. And to be fair – despite Microsoft’s assurances that they are “production ready”, I’ve personally hit a few coroutine bugs and they do occasionally completely break with compiler updates.
I’m going to write up my advice in a series of posts, as the examples can be pretty lengthy.

  1. Prefer a task chain to nested tasks
  2. Be aware of thread scheduling rules
  3. Stay aware of object and parameter lifetimes
  4. Consider the effect of OS suspend/resume
  5. Style: never put a try/catch block around a task chain.
  6. References

1. Prefer a Task Chain to Nested Tasks

When writing a series of API calls that need local variables, conditional logic, or loops, it’s tempting to write it as a nest of tasks. But a nest will: